A scholarly attempt at an interpretation of Sunday's liturgical readings.

Archive for August, 2018

Does bread really nourish?

Have you ever had someone ever tell you, “Who do you think you are?”  This question because the other person may well have thought that your enigmatic explanation made that individual feel ignorant.

In the Gospel for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time (John 6:41-51), Jesus is placed in a similar situation.  His statement is,  “I am the bread that came down from heaven.”  And the group of Jews surrounding Jesus becomes quite surprised by this statement and asks for an explanation.

What did Jesus mean by such a comment?  Seems to me that there are two important concepts here:  “bread,” and “from heaven.”  The first deals with nourishment, and the second deals with divine origin.

First, bread as nourishment.  Jesus tells the group that their ancestors ate Manna (bread-like edible food) in the desert.  The Israelites were crossing the desert as they were leaving Egypt for the promised land.

During this exodus  the people expressed hunger and called to God, via Moses, to give them food.  Then this Manna came from the heavens and the people were satisfied. (Cf. Exodus 16 for this narrative)  The people were nourished.  Then Jesus told the crowd that  this gesture occurred only once.  That is to say that these folks who received the Manna eventually died.  Consequently, this nourishment was totally physical.

Second, the concept of “from heaven.”  Manna came from the heavens as noted in the text from Exodus.  God sent the bread to nourish his people.  So, the gesture had a divine origin.

Now, what can we learn from the Gospel?  By reflecting on what Jesus said about himself.  Bread is nourishment.  We can become nourished by  receiving the Eucharist.  This is primarily spiritual nourishment and one can receive it more than once.

The Eucharist reminds us of the Last Supper and the use of bread to give life. Every time that we go to Mass, we become spiritually nourished by receiving the Eucharist.  This constancy of reflection and reception is almost a certainty for eternal life.

When Jesus says that he is “from heaven,” our background understanding brings to mind the liturgical seasons of Advent and Christmas.  For these seasons keep telling us that God became human in the person of Jesus Christ.  So what we understand when Jesus says that he is “from heaven,” we are in reality understanding his humanity and divinity. Our belief in this is reflected in our behavior toward others.

Nourished by the Eucharist (bread), and belief in the divinity of Jesus (from heaven), gives us pretty much of a guarantee of eternal life as long as we behave ourselves.

 

 

 

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Free lunch?

We all have to face it.  Many of us enjoy parties.  Some of the semi-obligatory  occasions are Thanksgiving, Christmas, birthdays, weddings, and the list could go on.

A major portion of the party enjoyment comes from the fact that someone else is providing the ingredients.  In the Gospel for the 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time (John 6:1-15), Jesus provided the ingredients for the “party” which was actually a free lunch.  It went something like this.

A large group of people followed Jesus to hear more of his message, but it was well past lunch time.  Jesus noticed this need and responded to it quickly. He saw that they were hungry. First, he told one of his closest disciples to hasten to the nearest store and see what food he could by.

But that disciple noted the size of the crowd was about 5,000 or more and realized that nobody had that kind of money to feed all these people.

Secondly, another of his chosen disciples, as if to belabor the obvious, told Jesus that there was a young lad nearby who had five loaves and two fish.  But he also added, “What are these among so many?”

Then Jesus took over the issue completely.  He took the five loaves and two fish, blessed them and asked his disciples to distribute them.  Surprisingly, not only did the people have enough to eat, but there were about twelve baskets of food left over!  The people realized that a miracle had taken place.

Now, what does the Gospel say to us personally?  First of all, Jesus responded to a need.  He saw the people in need, and responded to that need as best as he could.  We ourselves see others experiencing a need one way or another.  The big question here is “How soon do I respond to that need, if I respond at all?”  Are we aware that other people have needs even though they don’t outwardly manifest it?

Secondly, it is well to keep in mind that Jesus responded to that need with “bread” and “fish.”  Why is that significant?  Because since the beginning of Christianity “bread” and “fish” have been key symbols.

The “bread,” since New Testament times, has often symbolized the Eucharist.  We are reminded of the Last Supper when Jesus took the bread, blessed it and gave it to his apostles.  The word “blessed” comes from the Greek EUCHARISTIA meaning “gratitude,” “thanksgiving.”  (Cf. Matt: 26:26-30; Mark 14:22-26; Luke 22:14-23; and 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 for similar accounts of the institution of the Eucharist).

The “fish” has long been a symbol of Christian identification.  When early Christians met, they would draw a fish which explained that they were Christians.  The Greek word for fish is Ichthus in which each letter stands for the beginning of a word that means “Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior.”

So, we have the bread and the fish signifying the Eucharist and our Christianity via our Baptism.  Every time that we go to Mass we have the opportunity for a “free lunch” with fellow Christians.  The Eucharist will provide us with encouragement  and support to respond to the needs of others.  The miracle will be if we decide to respond positively to those needs of others.

 

 

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